Assess, Diagnose, Plan and Treat

We have the training and knowledge to Assess, Diagnose, Make a Plan and Treat the trees that you want to keep; we will talk you through all of the options. We will customize your services and treatment schedule to meet the individual needs of your property and your desired results. Our main focus is the health of trees; with the correct pest management and preservation of the natural tree formation we are promoting growth and longevity.

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Pest Control Management License

 Ohio Applicator ID# 150949

Insecticide Treatment

Top 6, Creepy Tree Bugs – Damaging Northern Ohio Trees

Tiny insects can wreak havoc on forests, neighborhood trees and plants. Listed are the most common insects that will severely damage healthy trees in the North Central Ohio region.

*Importance of EARLY DETECTION & RAPID RESPONSE
Be mindful about what to look for, here is some information to increase your awareness and knowledge of these tree-killers. Our Goal is to get homeowners involved by monitor so that an action can be quickly taken to eliminate the tree pests before they cause irreversible damage or death .

Helmlock Woolly AdelgidScientific Name :

Adelges tsugae

WHAT IS THE THREAT:

The Hemlock Woolly Adelgid (Adelges tsugae) aka HWA is an invasive, aphid-like insect that attacks and can kill North American hemlocks. HWA feeds on the sap of eastern hemlock and can be found at the base of the needles. Adults are dark in color and nymphs (crawlers) are reddish brown. The easiest way to find HWA is to look for white woolly material or ovisacs, which are especially visible in the winter months. HWA completes two asexual generations per year on Eastern Hemlock, both of which overlap as adults in the spring.

WHERE IS THE THREAT:

HWA is an invasive species from Asia that was first reported in the Eastern United States in 1951 near Richmond, Virginia. It has since infested the US east coast forest from Maine to Georgia, as well as parts of Michigan. Multiple counties have continued to document new infestations from 2016 onward.

A

B

A: Healthy hemlock tree

B: Hemlock infested with Hemlock Woolly Adelgid

Settled Hemlock Woolly Adelgid nymph

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid eggs

SYMPTOMS:

The earliest visible sign of HWA is the presence of white cottony masses usually located on the twigs and at the base of the needles. Populations tend to be denser in the lower limbs, but can reside anywhere on the tree. Symptoms will progress to fading and thinning foliage and dying limbs, which begin at the base of the tree and move upwards. Left untreated, tree mortality can occur over the course of 3-5 years.

WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT:

Arborjet recommends a trunk injection of IMA-jet® insecticide using systemic injection equipment. To increase the resilience of the tree, a follow up application of NutriRoot® or Mn-jet FeTM is recommended. Fall treatments typically coincide with HWA feeding. HWA mortality occurs after ingestion, generally within 14-28 days, and continues for up to 2 years. Cottony masses remain for some time, but eventually turn gray in color.

Tree Host:

  • Hemlock
  • Fir 
  • Spruce

Asian Loghorned BeetleScientific Name :

Anoplophora glabripennis

WHAT IS THE THREAT:

The Asian Longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabrimennis), or ALB, is an invasive, wood boring insect from China that was accidentally introduced to the New York State in 1996 via wood packaging materials. Adults are large, black beetles with irregular white spotting on their wings and long, black and white striped antennae that are primary active in early summer to fall. Most of the tree damage is caused by the cream colored, grub-like larvae that live under the bark of the tree throughout the winter and feed in the vascular cambium. This feeding puts trees under a substantial amount of stress, as it forces them to allocate their resources towards specific shoots, which can lead to leaf out failure and tree mortality.

WHERE IS THE THREAT:

ALB is primarily a pest of maple, but will also eat other hardwood species. The beetle has been identified in New York, New Jersey, Illinois, Ohio, and Massachusetts. There have been countless reports of ALB interceptions at warehouses and ports around the country, making it very likely that its distribution will continue to expand.

SYMPTOMS:

Symptoms of ALB infestation include, yellowing of the leaves and branch dieback. Additionally, “bleeding” wounds in the trunk or limbs may be present in the summer, as a result of female adult emergence. There may also be large (3/8”) sized, pefectly circular holes in the trunk or large limbs and frass (sawdust) on the ground near the holes. Larvae feed under the bark and destry the quality of the wood as they girdle the trees. Extensive densities over multiple seasons can cause tree mortality.

WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT:

Arborjet recommends treatment with IMA-jet® (imidacloprid) when ALB is detected in your area, but trees still appear healthy for best outcomes (dieback of symptoms <40%). Trees should be treated in the spring before adults become active in June.

Asian Longhorned Beetle larvae

Tree Host:

  • Elm
  • Maple
  • Birch
  • Willow
  • Box Elder
  • Horsechestnut
  • Buckeye
  • European Mountain Ash
  • Ash
  • Poplar
  • Albizzia
  • London Pain
  • Sycamore

Bagworms AllScientific Name :

Thyridopteryx ephemeraformis

WHAT IS THE THREAT:

The family of Bagworms is comprised of over 1000 species’ whose larvae are enclosed in a bag and most species have flightless adult females. The common bagworm, Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis, is one of the most damaging pests of urban trees and shrubs in the northeastern and southern U.S. Severe infestations can damage the aesthetics and health of host plants, especially juniper and arborvitae species, which are commonly grown in temperate climates.

WHERE IS THE THREAT:

The common bagworm, a native species, is distributed throughout the eastern United States, as far west as Nebraska and north to southern Michigan. The larvae feed on over 50 families of deciduous and evergreen trees and shrubs. Common hosts include juniper, arborvitae, oak, cedar and willow. Other hosts include maple, elm, pine, hawthorn, ligustrum, and viburnum

SYMPTOMS:

In the spring, very small caterpillars disperse by “ballooning”; spin strands of silk and carried by wind to new hosts. Initial feeding damage by bagworm on evergreen trees causes branch tips to appear brown and unhealthy. As the larvae become larger, their feeding damage becomes more apparent. During the summer, larvae can cause severe defoliation and even death, especially on evergreen species because their leaves are not replenished as readily as those of deciduous trees.

WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT:

Trunk injections of TREE-äge® or ACE-jet should be made in spring, when bagworm outbreaks are expected. TREE-äge® can provide protection for 2 years. Alternatively, treat with ACE-jet when leaf injury first appears, or when bags are first observed. One application is sufficient to control bagworm. ACE-jet remains active to protect the tree canopy for approximately 3 – 5 weeks. Alternatively, AzaSol, an insect growth regulator and feeding deterrent, can be applied as a trunk injection, soil drench or foliar spray.

Tree Host:

  • Juniper
  • Arborvitae
  • Cedars
  • Pine
  • Hemlock
  • Spruce
  • Chinese Elm
  • Honeylocust
  • Crabapple
  • Maple
  • Sycamore
  • Box Elder
  • Willow
  • Linden
  • Poplar

Emerald Ash BorderScientific Name :

Agrilus planipennis

WHAT IS THE THREAT:

The Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus planipennis), or EAB, is an invasive wood boring beetle that was first introduced from Asia to Detroit, Michigan in 2002 and is known to have spread to 36 states and four provinces. This small, metallic green wood-boring beetle attacks multiple ash species and can go unnoticed for several years. The larvae live under the bark of the tree and feed on the vascular cambium through the fall and winter. The feeding produce long serpintine galleries that can girdle branches and the main stem and lead to tree mortality.

WHERE IS THE THREAT:

EAB infests all ash species, but most commonly attack green, white and black ash. Initial infestations were documented in Michigan and Ontario Canada. Populations continued to spread throughout the Midwest and Canada. In 2013, EAB eventually found its way to New England, Georgia, and Colorado. By 2019, infestations have been confirmed from Texas and South Dakota, to Nova Scotia, Canada.

SYMPTOMS:

EAB larvae live under the bark and create meandering galleries through the phloem, cambium and the xylem layers, effectively girdling the tree. In response to upper canopy dieback, trees will sprout new (epicormic) branches in the lower crown. Adults create D-shaped exit holes when they emerge in June. Bark cracks that reveal larval galleries and woodpecker activity are also signs of EAB infestation. Since EAB often goes unnoticed for several years, trees may die within two years of the onset of symptoms.

WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT:

For best outcomes, Arborjet recommends treatment of trees that still appear healthy (dieback symptoms <40%) when EAB is detected in your area. Our most effective solutions include two emamectin benzoate products, TREE-äge® R10 and TREE-äge® G4 . Both products can be applied anytime there is good soil moisture, usually June through September. In dry conditions, a follow up application of NutriRoot® could improve tree health. IMA-jet® provides annual control and may be preferred when piercing, sucking insects are present.

Tree Host:

  • Ash Species
  • Including Green white, black and blur ash

Gypsy MothScientific Name :

Lynamtria dispar

WHAT IS THE THREAT:

The gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) was accidentally introduced to the United States in the 1800’s. Originally brought to the U.S. to manufacture silk, it subsequently escaped and has caused extensive foliar damage to a diverse array of deciduous trees. Under wet, rainy conditions, gypsy moth populations can be naturally controlled by a fungus (Entomphaga maimaiga), introduced from Japan in 1910. Recently, there has been a resurgence of gypsy moth populations in the eastern United States, largely due to prolonged, dry springs, which prevented fungal establishment.

WHERE IS THE THREAT:

Gypsy moth is a forest and urban pest in the eastern United States. Caterpillars feed on a multitude of tree species, and when they reach high population densities, they will feed on almost any tree or shrub. Their preferred species include oak, maple, beech, birch, hawthorn, apple, poplar, and willow.

SYMPTOMS:

Dark colored, hairy caterpillars with 5 pairs of blue and 6 pairs of red dots lining their back can be seen in May and June. White female and brown male moths are active throughout July and August. The caterpillars are responsible for tree damage, feeding on foliage and stressing the tree. Trees that are completely defoliated may re-foliate 3-4 weeks after feeding ends; however, this requires the trees to expend an enormous amount of energy. As a result, repeated defoliations may kill the trees or severely weaken them, making them vulnerable to secondary mortality factors.

WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT:

Trunk injection with any of the TREE-äge® family of products and Mn-jet FeTM will provide both preventative and curative control depending on the time of year treatment is applied. We recommend treatment in late September, which will minimize early pest damage the following spring.

Tree Host:

  • Oak; white oaks preferred

Spotted LanterflyScientific Name :

Lycorma delicatula

WHAT IS THE THREAT:

The Spotted Lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) aka SLF is a large piercing and sucking insect, which feeds on the sap of many plants during the younger nymph stages but prefers trees in the later instar nymph and adult stages. Adults have black bodies with brightly colored underwings. SLF front wings are gray with black spots, and the tips of the wings are black with gray veins. Nymphs are black and white for the first three instars but are mostly red in the last instar stage. All stages are excellent jumpers, but the adults will fly to some extent. SLF completes one generation per year, with the egg stage overwintering.

WHERE IS THE THREAT:

SLF is an invasive species from Asia that was first reported in Burks County, PA in 2014. It has since become established in PA, VA, DE, and NJ and has been detected in NY, MD, CT, and MA. SLF is known to feed on more than 70 species of plants and trees, including wild and cultivated grapes, hops, tree of heaven, walnut, maple, and birch.

SYMPTOMS:

Trees attacked by SLF will develop weeping wounds, which leave a grayish or black trail along the trunk. This sap attracts other insects like wasps, ants, and flies to feed. Honeydew released by feeding adults will cover surfaces under trees and serve as a medium for black sooty mold. In late fall, adults will lay egg masses on host trees and nearby smooth surfaces. Newly laid egg masses have a gray mud- like covering. Old egg masses appear as rows of brownish seed-like deposits on the trunk and underside of branches, roughly an inch long. Left untreated, SLF feeding will cause yellowing of branch tips on host trees. Tree mortality can occur over the course of 2-5 years.

WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT:

A mid-summer (July) trunk injection of IMA-jet® is recommended. To increase the tree’s resilience, follow up with an application of NutriRoot® or Mn-jet FeTM. SLF mortality occurs after ingestion, generally within a few days of treatment, and continues for a full season. Adults may continue to migrate to attractive treated trees into the fall, but feeding is limited, and honeydew and sooty mold production will decline.

Tree Host:

  • Maple
  • Walnut
  • Birch
  • Yellow Poplar

Fungicide Treatment

Nutrient Treatment

Root – Fruit – Flower